daily meditation: Uplifting Others

“And it came to pass, when Moses held up his hand, that Israel prevailed.”

– Exodus 17:11, JPS 1917 Tanach

During the war with Amalek, with Joshua at the helm, Moshe stood on a hill and prayed. How did he pray? He lifted up his hands; actually, he held the staff above his head for hours upon hours. So much of a burden was this that two men, Aaron and Hur “stayed up his hands, the one on the one side, and the other on the other side; and his hands were steady, until the going down of the sun” (Exodus 17:12).

Amalek was weakened, because of the divine effort made on the part of Moshe, combined with the actual battle wherein Joshua led the Children of Israel. Yet, Aaron and Hur also deserve credit, inasmuch that they supported Moshe as he prayed to H’Shem. One can also imagine the people, seeing Moshe on the mountain, continuously lifting “the staff of G-d” (Exodus 17:9) above his head, gathering strength from this inspiring show of encouragement.

The people on the front line of this battle were supplemented in their war against Amalek by the continuous prayer of Moshe. This serves as an example to us; for many are battling against this modern day plague of Corona virus, that can even be likened to Amalek. For the inhumanity of Amalek manifested in their attack upon the most vulnerable of the population, who were as stragglers at the rear of the procession from camp to camp.

Therefore, our heartfelt prayers as well as our contributions in other ways may serve as behind the scenes support in this battle against a plague that mostly inflicts serious injury to the elderly, as well as those with preexistent medical conditions. Yet, recent statistics show that even those between 20 and 54 are being seriously afflicted by Corona virus. It is time to pray, heartfelt prayer to H’Shem, until the sun sets on this plague, when it is banished from the world.

“Be Thou exalted, O L-RD, in Thy strength; so will we sing and praise Thy power.”

– Psalm 21:13

Chanukah lights

B”H

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Each day of the eight days of Chanukah, a candle is lit, successively, so that on the first day – one candle is lit, then two candles on the eve of the second day, and so on. Yet, if you look at a menorah designed for Chanukah, there are nine candle holders. (Unless the menorah uses oil with tiny wicks, then there are nine repositories for the oil). The reason for a total of nine, is to have a place, usually in the center of the menorah, for the shamash (servant) candle, that is used to light all of the other candles. This candle is lit first; then, it shares its light with the other candles.

The tradition is reminiscent of the pasuk (verse), “In Thy light do we see light” (Psalm 36:10, JPS 1917 Tanach). H’Shem is the source of life, that bestows light upon us; we are connected, even dependent upon Him for every breathe we take. “For Thou dost light my lamp; the L-RD my G-d doth lighten my darkness” (Psalm 18:29, JPS). At the darkest time of the year, may we hope to be enlightened by H’Shem, by way of His emes (truth), and chesed (mercy), two key components of Chanukah; for His truth led us in the darkness against our enemies; and, through His mercy the few were able to defeat the many.

the Spirit of Chanukah

B”H

27 Kislev 5780

by Tzvi Schnee

“Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit, saith the L-RD of hosts.”

– Zechariah 4:6, JPS 1917 Tanach

The miracle of the oil that lasted eight days, giving light to the Menorah inside of the Temple, not the military victory of the Maccabees (a small group of pious Jewish fighters) over the Syrians is emphasized, as per the ruling of the Sages. We celebrate Chanukah in recognition of G-d’s Spirit enabling us to defeat our enemies, not by our own strength or strategical prowess in battle.

Likewise, in recognition of G-d’s hand in our lives, we may bravely face the day, with Him on our side; yet, at the same time, humbling ourselves before Him, inclusive of accepting His plans for us, replete with an acknowledgment of His guidance. He will not lead us astray; rather, he will lead us into victory time and time again. May we be able to conquer our inner battles, with a little help from Above.

erev Chanukah (1st night)

B”H

Historically, Chanukah commemorates the victory of the Macabbees, a small group of pious Jews, who defeated the invading Syrian army. Yet, the Sages deliberately emphasized the miracle of the oil, instead of the military might of the Macabbees. Apropos of reframing the emphasis of the holiday, the Sages brought forth this pasuk (verse) as a reminder of the help the Jewish people received from G-d, when defending themselves against an army much greater than them: “Not by might, nor by power, but by My spirit, saith the L-RD of hosts” (Zechariah 4:6, JPS 1917 Tanach).

The miracle of the oil, has to do with the pure olive oil that was used in the Temple to light the seven-candled menorah that rested in the sanctuary. After cleaning up the Temple, that had been ransacked by the Syrian army, only one cruze of this pure oil was found. Regular olive oil could not be used for such a holy purpose as lighting this menorah inside of the sanctuary. Because the cruze of oil was only enough for one day, there would not have been enough time to prepare more oil, to keep the menorah burning on successive days. Yet, a miracle occurred: the single cruze of oil lasted for eight days. That is the reason we light candles for eight days on Chanukah.