Extreme Endurance

B”H

Omer Count: Day 25

netzach shebbe netzach

endurance within endurance

At times in our lives, we are challenged by the need to be persistent in an especially important endeavor. Whatever that endeavor may be, our inner strength is crucial to success. This required endurance may even be long term, going for weeks, months or years. Yet, beyond our own reservoir of strength, we can also draw from an Unlimited Source. When we cast our burdens on Him, then He will help us to endure (Psalm 55:23).

discipline within harmony

B”H

April 25, 2020

Counting of the Omer 5780

gevurah shebbe tiferes

(discipline within harmony)

Tiferes may also be rendered as “compassion;” perhaps, because an inner harmony is important, in order to be sincerely compassionate towards another human being. Therefore, in considering the significance of discipline within compassion, we may remind ourselves that a show of compassion without boundaries, as good as this may sound, may not always be wise. Rather, compassion should be shown in a selfless way to others, in measure with the required amount of kindness due to the recipient.

Think of some other examples for yourselves.

daily meditation: Uplifting Others

“And it came to pass, when Moses held up his hand, that Israel prevailed.”

– Exodus 17:11, JPS 1917 Tanach

During the war with Amalek, with Joshua at the helm, Moshe stood on a hill and prayed. How did he pray? He lifted up his hands; actually, he held the staff above his head for hours upon hours. So much of a burden was this that two men, Aaron and Hur “stayed up his hands, the one on the one side, and the other on the other side; and his hands were steady, until the going down of the sun” (Exodus 17:12).

Amalek was weakened, because of the divine effort made on the part of Moshe, combined with the actual battle wherein Joshua led the Children of Israel. Yet, Aaron and Hur also deserve credit, inasmuch that they supported Moshe as he prayed to H’Shem. One can also imagine the people, seeing Moshe on the mountain, continuously lifting “the staff of G-d” (Exodus 17:9) above his head, gathering strength from this inspiring show of encouragement.

The people on the front line of this battle were supplemented in their war against Amalek by the continuous prayer of Moshe. This serves as an example to us; for many are battling against this modern day plague of Corona virus, that can even be likened to Amalek. For the inhumanity of Amalek manifested in their attack upon the most vulnerable of the population, who were as stragglers at the rear of the procession from camp to camp.

Therefore, our heartfelt prayers as well as our contributions in other ways may serve as behind the scenes support in this battle against a plague that mostly inflicts serious injury to the elderly, as well as those with preexistent medical conditions. Yet, recent statistics show that even those between 20 and 54 are being seriously afflicted by Corona virus. It is time to pray, heartfelt prayer to H’Shem, until the sun sets on this plague, when it is banished from the world.

“Be Thou exalted, O L-RD, in Thy strength; so will we sing and praise Thy power.”

– Psalm 21:13

Light Will Prevail

B”H

erev 2 Teves 5780

– eighth night of Chanukah

Light will transcend the darkness in our lives when we cast our gaze towards the flame of truth, the eish tamid (eternal light) that is symbolized by Chanukah. The light of the Menorah in the temple, lit by the small cruze of oil found amidst the debris in the Temple, is the light of hope and renewal.

A little known midrash connects that small cruze of oil to the renewal of mankind, creation, and the earth itself, after the Mavul (Flood). When the dove brought back an olive branch in it’s mouth, according to the midrash, Noah pressed enough olive oil to place inside a small container. This cruze of oil was passed down to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. When Jacob returned to Beth El, he anointed the foundation stone with this oil. Then, according to the midrash, he hid the small cruze of precious olive oil.

This Place (HaMakom) was none other than Mt. Moriah, where the Temple was eventually established. Yes; because of the miracle of light that lasted for eight days from this precious oil, we celebrate Chanukah today. Midrash is not always meant to be taken literally; therefore, a symbolic viewpoint may be rendered from this particular midrash. The message of hope will be like a small flame illuminating the darkness, despite whatever circumstances may cast a shadow over our lives.

Yehi ratzon. May it be His will that the light of hope and renewal throughout the ages will always prevail over darkness. Amein.