self renewal

B”H

Today’s middot are malchut shebbe malchut (sovereignty within sovereignty). This may be compared to the goal of self-actualization as found within a psychological framework. Finding a meaningful path to pursue in life will lead to ultimate personal fulfillment. The soul’s mission in life may also be compared to the goal of self actualization. Under G-d’s directive, whether we realize it or not, through His hasgacha peratis (divine guidance) that is placed upon us all, we are guided to what will steer us in the right direction.

On Shavuot (the fiftieth day), the culmination of the forty-nine day journey through self renewal, by way of examining our character, reaches its goal. As H’Shem said to Moses, “when thou hast brought forth the people out of Egypt, ye shall serve G-d upon this mountain” (Exodus 3:12, JPS 1917 Tanach). We receive the Torah anew, in the very present moment of our lives. H’Shem willing, the refinement of our soul over the past seven weeks has brought us closer to the fulfillment of peace and wholeness in our lives.

“The path of the righteous is as the light of dawn, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day.”

– Proverbs 4 :118, JPS 1917 Tanach

Omer Day 49

Steadfastness

B”H

yesod shebbe malchus

(foundation within sovereignty)

Photo by James Wheeler from Pexels

A strong foundational belief system is necessary in order to maintain a sense of autonomy. Without reference points, in regard to one’s identity, it would be too easy to be swayed by this, that or the other opinion, trend, or viewpoints of others. A tenacious adherence to a set of values, beliefs, or overall conception of oneself will be a fence around an individual’s autonomy.

Otherwise, we would be subject to drown in a sea of nihilism, where values do not matter, and life has no directive towards an ultimate purpose. G-d forbid. Therefore, to cling to the truth through deveykus is paramount not only to connect to G-d, but to also remain steadfast on the derech (path) of life.

Omer Day 48

Reaching Out

B”H

tiferes shebbe malchus
(harmony within sovereignty)

Tiferes represents harmony, beauty, and compassion. The polar opposites of chesed (kindness) and gevurah (severity) are balanced within tiferes. In relation to malchus (sovereignty), tiferes may be explored as the amount of felt compassion towards others, necessary, when honoring other’s autonomy, dignity, and self-worth. A healthy respect for the autonomy of others includes, an appreciation of who they are as a unique individual.

In order to appreciate the other, it may be necessary, to step out of the “egoic shell.” A preoccupation with self will not allow an individual to see the beauty in the lives of others. To be sovereign over oneself, to the extent that the door is closed to others, leaves an emptiness, devoid of the vicissitudes of life – the ever changing moments. In other words, self autonomy should not preclude vulnerability; no man is island.

Omer Day 45

The Kind Judge

B”H

gevurah shebbe malchus

(strength within sovereignty)

Gevurah represents discipline, severity, and judgment; incidentally, gevurah is the opposite of chesed (kindness). Malchut (sovereignty) is often denoted as autonomy, for the sake of this series that explores the sefirot as middot (character traits), during the seven week counting of the Omer.

G-d’s sovereignty is made known through His commandments; his gevurah (strength, justice, severity) through his judgments. On the otherhand, His attribute of chesed (mercy) is exhibited through His kindness. These two attributes work in tandem.

If He did not let His judgments be known through His interactions within the affairs of the world, He would appear to be tolerant of mankind’s shortcomings to the extent of a permissiveness that would convey a lax attitude on His part, as if any behavior on our part is acceptable. Yet, when we turn our hearts towards Him, He will bestow kindnesses upon us.

Moreover, He will help us improve ourselves, so that we will not fall under judgment. Because His expectations of us are clear, as represented by His commandments, His judgment is valid. Yet, often His judgment is in the form of chastisement, designed to compel us to return from our errant ways. As is written, “For whom the L-RD loveth He correcteth, even as a father the son in whom he delighteth. (Proverbs 3:12).

Day 44

Reflect Kindness

B”H

Day 43

28 Iyar 5780 (May 22, 2020)

chesed shebbe malchus

(kindness within sovereignty)

Today begins a seven day focus on malchus (sovereignty), in combination with the other six emotional attributes. The first of these to be explored in relationship to malchus is chesed (kindness, mercy, love). Malchus (sovereignty) may be said to represent autonomy. Human beings are created in G-d’s image, so we are obligated by our godly nature, at least to make an attempt to reflect His attributes. We were also given free will; therefore, to varying degrees, we may seek an autonomous stance in life; yet, to see ourselves as independent of G-d would only be self-deception.

In our quest to seek autonomy in life, to define ourselves as an individual, with a unique personality, we should add a measure of kindness. It is not necessary to shout, “this is who I am;” rather, simply to assert ourselves in regard to our personal viewpoints. Be kind to others; allow them to express their own viewpoints; give warm regard for shared thoughts about life, the universe, and G-d. Healthy respect for the autonomy of others includes allowing enough space for others to share; spiritual growth thrives when given room to grow. Sometimes this requires silence on our part, for the sake of listening.

Day 43

Look Above

B”H

Malchus shebbe yesod

(sovereignty within foundation)

Despite whatever circumstances we may encounter in life, if we have a strong foundation we will be able to meet these challenges with dignity, a sense of self autonomy and a calm reserve, knowing that ultimately we are not in control of external events in any sphere of our lives, personal, communal, or global. Although this sounds counterintuitive, we may feel reassured that when we place our trust in G-d, acknowledging His sovereignty, we do not have to stand alone in the face of adversity.

Therefore, when we falter, because we fail to acknowledge that our own sovereignty is limited, we can rest in the knowledge that everything H’Shem (the L-RD) does is for the good. We can not control externals, however we may choose how to respond. “I will lift up mine eyes unto the mountains: From whence shall my help come? My help cometh from the L-RD, Who made heaven and earth” (Psalm 121:1-2, JPS 1917 Tanach).